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Weaving Futures: Week 11 | Ismini Samanidou

Weaving Futures is an exhibition at London Transport Museum highlighting the importance of woven textile design to the London Transport system. The exhibition explores the process and making of digital woven textiles, as part of the Museums’, Designology season. Weaving Futures is curated by Philippa Brock and Samuel Plant Dempsey.

Each week, visitors will can see invited designers/artists in residence in the Designology studio, who will be working on a project brief and interacting with a weaver in their residency dates. The weavers will be interpreting the residents work live into digital woven textile prototypes and final works on a state-of-the-art TC2 digital jacquard loom. 

Week 11 features:  Ismini Samanidou
Residency dates: 1st – 4th Feb 2017
Activity days 3rd & 4th Feb 2017

Athens born and South East of England based artist Ismini Samanidou trained at Central Saint Martins and the Royal College of Art. Her practice touches on the boundaries of craft, art and design with work developed for site specific commissions, industry collaborations and unique pieces for exhibition.  The work is often site specific and explores the way textiles can be articulated within a space. Ismini has travelled and researched textile techniques worldwide and is principally interested in the way weaving exists as an autonomous language crossing cultural and political

Her work has been exhibited internationally with solo shows in the UK and USA. Recent work includes commissioned textile panels for the National Theatre in London, an invited residency at the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation in Connecticut, USA and work exhibited at the Espace De L’Art Concret in France and the Hangzhou Textile Triennial in China. Ismini’s textiles are held in private and public collections including the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.

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Company Profile: Rare Thread

Rare Thread is a textile studio/collective conceived by Laura Miles and Kirsty McDougall and incorporates a team of designers and specialists including Ruth Greany, Stephanie Rolph, Sophia Fenlon and Hannah Auerbach George.

The designers of Rare Thread work collaboratively on collections and projects as well as retaining autonomy on other aspects of their practice.

With combined experience in industry of 35 years, Laura and Kirsty decided to merge their individual creative studio businesses to champion hand and machine woven textile design and finishing for a broad variety of textile outcomes including Fashion, Interiors and CMF to Material Development and Trend.

From their studio in Dalston, London- Rare Thread will celebrate, question and promote weaving in all its forms and contexts. The studio offers loom hire to emerging designers and industry and also offers support and advice to new graduates starting out in woven textiles.

Rare Thread welcome projects and collaboration from the fashion, interiors and manufacturing industries, artists and scientists alongside organisations and individuals interested in developing sustainable textile solutions.

Woven textile designers are often the hidden force behind many of the extraordinary textiles seen on catwalk. Between them Laura Miles and Kirsty McDougall have worked with Marc Jacobs, Valentino Couture, Calvin Klein, Balmain, Proenza Schouler, Chanel, Balenciaga, YSL, Erdem and Christopher Kane, to combine innovative material mixes and constructions. They have excellent global networks across yarn, material, woven manufacturing and finish. Continue reading →

Weaving Futures: Week 8 | Takram

takram-cloplWeaving Futures is an exhibition at London Transport Museum highlighting the importance of woven textile design to the London Transport system. The exhibition explores the process and making of digital woven textiles, as part of the Museums’, Designology season.

Each week, visitors will can see invited designers/artists in residence in the Designology studio, who will be working on a project brief and interacting with a weaver in their residency dates. The weavers will be interpreting the residents work live into digital woven textile prototypes and final works on a state-of-the-art TC2 digital jacquard loom. 

Week 8 features:  Takram
Residency dates: 9th – 14th Jan 2017
Activity days: 12th & Loom running 14th Jan 2017

Founded in 2006, Takram is a creative innovation firm with studios in Tokyo and London. Specialists in concept, product, and experience design, they work with leading international businesses and institutions across transportation, automotive, consumer products and technology, retail, finance and media.

Multi-disciplined, they thrive on the synergy of different talents and professions, and the scope of their projects range from hardware to software, from architecture to digital art, and from organisational communication to education programs Continue reading →

Weaving Futures: Week 7 | Josephine Ortega

lr-yellow-close-up-josephine-ortega-1Weaving Futures is an exhibition at London Transport Museum highlighting the importance of woven textile design to the London Transport system. The exhibition explores the process and making of digital woven textiles, as part of the Museums’, Designology season.

Each week, visitors will be able to see invited designers/artists in residence in the Designology studio, who will be working on a project brief and interacting with a weaver in their residency dates. The weavers will be interpreting the residents work live into digital woven textile prototypes and final works on a state-of-the-art TC2 digital jacquard loom. 

Week  7  features:  Josephine Ortega
Residency dates: 5th – 7th Jan 2017
Activity Days: 6th & 7th Jan 2017

Born in Nottingham, UK, Josephine Ortega is a Textile Designer who recently graduated  from Central Saint Martins. During her degree she specialised in Woven Textiles, exploring construction of yarn through the loom. Throughout her final year, Ortega began to explore alternative methods of construction, which meant her designs developed off loom and she began to explore a traditional tug-making technique that became the basis for her final major project.

Her recent  collection, ‘Grid’ investigated the perception of ‘comfort’, culminating in textile proposals for transport seating.
In order to define the abstract notion of ‘comfort’, Ortega
 collected people’s testaments on where and when they feel at their most comfortable.

Compiling responses and accompanying photography of the individuals’ homes, the designer created a visualisation of comfort, ultimately offering her a palette of colour, pattern and yarn choice with which to work.
Wanting to challenge the boundaries of weight, density and scale throughout transport fabrics, Ortega explored construction methods, material investigation and dyeing processes throughout her work, resulting in bespoke, hand crafted designs.

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Ethnographic Research Project: The Woven Kind

extraweft

The Woven Kind is a new ethnographic and global Artisan Textile project, working to document, promote and preserve global traditional weaving techniques.

Designed to establish international relationships with global artisan textile communities and their NGO partners, the work will help encourage widened appreciation of each country’s cultural heritage in textiles, stimulating an interest of woven textiles in a global context.

Juliet Graziano and Caroline Donaldson of illae woven studio  are developing this project to enhance their understanding of an ancient craft, which remains fundamental to the economic sustainability of the local artisans and their communities.

With their initial trip to India in January 2017, Juliet and Caroline hope to continue this project globally, researching and visiting different countries with a rich heritage in hand-weaving, to build an extensive and exciting body of research for public dissemination.

The research will inform a series of outcomes.

  • Online database of research
  • A series of lectures and article
  • An informative film
  • An exhibition
  • A self published book
  • Textiles archive

Each outcome will be accessible to all weavers and artists in the UK to engage with India

The initial trip will see Juliet and Caroline visit the Western Rajasthani village of Pokhran with their partner NGO Rangsutra .

Their research will focus on several stages of weaving, from initial design idea to loom set up and their use of tools.rangsutra-1

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Weaving Futures: Week 4 | Gainsborough

gainsborough-2Weaving Futures is an exhibition at London Transport Museum highlighting the importance of woven textile design to the London Transport system. The exhibition explores the process and making of digital woven textiles, as part of the Museums’, Designology season.

Each week, visitors will be able to see invited designers/artists in residence in the Designology studio, who will be working on a project brief and interacting with a weaver in their residency dates. The weavers will be interpreting the residents work live into digital woven textile prototypes and final works on a state-of-the-art TC2 digital jacquard loom. 

 Week  4 features: Gainsborough

Gainsborough is a Jacquard weaving mill and dye house based in Suffolk, producing the highest quality of cloth from both modern and traditional punch card looms. Established in 1903 by an enterprising weaver, Reginald Warner, the business moved to its present location in 1924.Offering a truly bespoke design service, Gainsborough runs an in-house operation from design and dying through to weaving.  With a wonderful archive of over 7,000 designs built up through Warner’s Grand Tours and successive generations of weaving, Gainsborough is by nature a very special and unfortunately rare example of British craftsmanship and artisanal manufacture.

Awarded the Royal Warrant in 1981, the company has produced fabrics for royal palaces, state buildings and grand residences the world over, and the tradition of creating fabrics of enduring quality carries on today. Gainsborough’s reputation was built on innovation and design, and you are as likely to find our products in a luxury vehicle or on a Parisian catwalk as on the walls of a stately home. Their designs span the full breadth of creative expression, from the very traditional to the thoroughly avant-garde.gainsborough-1 Continue reading →

Jacquard Ribbon Loom Restoration: Emma Wood

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An exciting new project has begun at the German Museum of Technology (Deutsches Technikmuseum) in Berlin, focused on the repair and restoration of their star Jacquard. The photograph of the loom (above) is prior to restoration

The project is being undertaken by Berlin-based British weaver Emma Wood, along with Birgit Zehlike & Nael Alkhteb of Oranienburg, and will run until November 2016. The restoration is taking place in the main hall of the museum, and is open for all visitors to watch.

Emma Wood will be reporting for The Weave Shed on the restoration of a jacquard loom in Berlin in a series of posts during her residency.

This particular Jacquard was built in the 1920s in Germany, and it arrived at the museum in around 1990, shortly after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The loom is designed for weaving ribbons, and it has two Jacquard mechanisms, each one being capable of producing 9 ribbons simultaneously. Sadly the loom has fallen into a state of disrepair after roughly a decade of non-use, but this restoration project provides a rare opportunity to get up-close and personal with such a specialised loom.

First Days
The first days of the restoration involved doing an overall analysis of the loom, and getting to grips with how it works.  The Jacquard mechanisms are operated by punchcards, and the warp threads are spread across individual spools, instead of warp beams.  These spools are then weighted to set the tension.

Emma wood 2

Beginning the analysis at the top of the loom, it became clear to the team that a piece from the left Jacquard mechanism was missing, which would help rotate the punchcards evenly.  It was also obvious that a large number of the punchcards were damaged, most likely from water damage and humidity.  The damaged punchcards offer an exciting opportunity to experiment with new techniques and materials, and to use some of the latest technology to create cards that are both precise and long-lasting.

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The remaining bulk of the work over the first days has been focused on thoroughly cleaning the entire loom.  Given that it was last operated over 10 years, the team have found themselves faced with a fair amount of mechanical grease and dirt, all of which needs to be cleaned away.  The results are already rewarding, as they have begun to unearth stunning steel and brass metalwork, along with uncovering the original deep green of the loom’s mainframe. Continue reading →

New Weaving Companies: Island of Yell, Shetland

GlobalYell Production pictures - 8Two new companies  have been set up on the Island of  Yell, Shetland; GlobalYell Production and The Shetland Tweed Company. GlobalYell Production is a small to medium scale manufacturing plant using a 24 shaft AVL Industrial Dobby Loom to produce runs of up to 100 m, while The Shetland Tweed Company is a design company which produces tweeds for the fashion industry, and which offers design consultancy.

GlobalYell Production offers woven short and medium runs and is part of GlobalYell which runs residencies and stays for makers. The manufacturing company runs a 24 shaft AVL Industrial Dobby Loom, weaving at 1.5m width and specialises in short and medium length runs with a minimum order of ten metres and a maximum order of fifty metres per bolt. Longer runs can be made through partner mills in Shetland and Scotland.

GlobalYell Production pictures - 13The company works with clients who want bespoke and exclusive fabrics as well as weaving pre-designed cloths for artists, craftspeople, and industry, and partners with design company, The Shetland Tweed Company, also based in Yell, if design consultation is needed. Yarns can be sourced and the lead-time for completed cloth is ten to twelve weeks with professional finishing done in the Borders of Scotland or, if desired, in-house at the studio.

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Collaboration project: Nadia – Anne Ricketts

Beatie Wolfe, David Mason aka Mr Fish & BeatWoven by Stuart NichollsSeeing music differently in The House of Rock; 34 Montague Square.

A collaboration between woven textile artist Nadia-Anne Ricketts from BeatWoven, musician Beatie Wolfe and Saville Row tailor David Mason of Mr. Fish.

It all began on the night of a book launch; The Digital Handmade : Craftsmanship in the New Industrial Revolution, where both textile artist Nadia-Anne Ricketts and innovative musician Beatie Wolfe were introduced by the author Lucy Johnston . It was the beginning of a collaboration where the five worlds of fashion, music, craft, history and technology would collide to show how music and craft can be worn and seen very differently in a compelling, storytelling way.

ProcessDubbed ‘The Secret Abbey Road’, 34 Montague Square is the former home of Hendrix, McCartney, Lennon and Ono; and the very birthplace of a ‘Wind Cries Mary’ and ‘Eleanor Rigby’.

The basement flat now belongs to savile row tailor, David Mason, an already collaborative partner to Beatie Wolfe. Both were eager to launch both David’s new acquisition; the re-launch of the flamboyant fashion label to the rock stars of the 60’s – Hendrix, Bowie and Jagger to name a few – Mr. Fish; with the release of Beatie’s new album consisted of music lyrics inspired by the very people that inhabited the space fifty years ago.
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Profile: Mayumi Kaneko

andonMayumi Kaneko is a hand weaver who came to the UK in 2003 and learned weaving from local weavers. She was educated in the UK and finished her post graduate course at Bath School of Art and Design in 2013.

She develops woven textures and patterns to make beautiful and intriguing fabrics, having a great passion for materials in particular paper yarn. She designs for fashion, interiors and lighting.

Using paper yarn  woven fabrics  in conjunction with lighting, exciting visual effects are  produced. The woven fabrics can be folded in different patterns which are derived from Japanese origami techniques, creating strength. The resulting faceted shapes produce the variety of light and shadow. Her lights introduce the sculptural art of lighting and whist having strong abstract and geometric forms, show clear inspiration from natural growth forms.
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