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Annual Textile Lecture: Matilda McQuaid | Creative Arts Farnham

The International Textile Research Centre at University for the Creative Arts Farnham announces that the Inaugural Annual Textile Lecture: The Future With Textiles will be given by Matilda McQuaid. Deputy Director of Curatorial and Head of Textiles, Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum New York

Matilda McQuaid is Deputy Director of Curatorial and Head of the Textiles Department at the Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Design Museum. Prior to the Cooper Hewitt, she worked at The Museum of Modern Art, NY, where she curated over 30 exhibitions, including the highly acclaimed “Structure and Surface: Contemporary Japanese Textiles.”

At Cooper Hewitt, her exhibitions have included “Josef + Anni Albers: Designs for Living” (2004), “Extreme Textiles: Designing for High Performance” (2005), “Color Moves: Art and Fashion by Sonia Delaunay” (2011), “Tools: Extending Our Reach” (2014), “Scraps: fashion, textiles and creative reuse” (2016 with Susan Brown).

Among her many publications is ‘Shigeru Ban’ (2006) the seminal book on this Japanese architect. She is currently researching the exhibition ‘The Future of Textiles’.

Date: February 22nd 2019 at 2pm
Cost: £20, concessions £10, to include afternoon tea
Click here for booking and further information

Photo copyright: Peta Jacobs

Uniqlo Tate Late: November 2018 | Weavers Talks / Events

Uniqlo Tate Late – November celebrates all things weaving and other events.

The London Loom Lounge 
Explore the Loom Lounge hosted by The London Loom, brimming with weaving wonders including oversized looms, weaving-inspired badges, yarn displays, music and talks.

18.30–18.50: Nadia-Anne Ricketts, founder of BeatWoven, discusses how she has fused the patterns of music and weaving in her artistic work.

19.30–19.50: Ismini Samanidou, the first weaver-in-residence at the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, discusses the links between her weaving practice, photography and improvisation, and Anni Albers’s enduring influence.

20.30–20.50: Dr Priti Veja talks about her research into woven electronic textiles and how she combines innovative design methods with weaving.

21.00–21.20: Do you know your warp from your weft? Join The London Loom’s craft quiz with yarn-inspired prizes at stake. Crafters – this is your chance to shine! Show offs welcome.

Weaving Futures
Meet the next generation of weavers! Drop in to Central Saint Martins’ pop-up weaving lab, hosted by Philippa Brock, jacquard weaver and Tutor, and BA (Hons) Textile Design 2nd Year students – Kieu Vu, Francesca Miotti , Fadhel Mourali and Zoe Daley  to see weaving in action, explore weavers’ sketchbooks and chat to them about their processes.

Audio Tapestry
Explore Stewart Easton’s hand-stitched tapestry where textiles and sound art merge to create a unique audio piece that responds to your touch.

For all other events that night click on the Uniqlo Tate Late link

 

 

Anni Albers: Tate Modern

This autumn Tate Modern will present the UK’s first major retrospective of the work of Anni Albers (1899-1994). This exhibition will bring together her most important works from major collections in the US and Europe, many of which will be shown in the UK for the first time, to highlight Albers’s significance as an artist.

Opening ahead of the centenary of the Bauhaus in 2019, this exhibition is long overdue recognition of Albers’s pivotal contribution to modern art and design, and part of Tate Modern’s wider commitment to showing artists working in textiles.

Anni Albers combined the ancient craft of hand-weaving with the language of modern art, finding within the medium many possibilities for the expression of modern life.

Featuring over 350 objects including beautiful small-scale studies, large wall-hangings, jewellery made from everyday items, and textiles designed for mass production, this exhibition will explore the many aspects of Albers’s practice – such as the intersection between art and craft; hand-weaving and machine production; ancient and modern.

Albers held a long-standing interest in the relationship between textiles and architecture and the show will highlight her lesser-known commissioned works in this area. The exhibition design will take inspiration from the artist’s own writings, such as her seminal essay ‘The Pliable Plane: Textiles in Architecture’, 1957, in which Albers advocates ‘a new understanding between the architect and the inventive weaver’.

Born in Berlin at the turn of the century, Annelise Else Frieda Fleischmann became a student at the Bauhaus in 1922, where she met her husband Josef Albers and other key modernist figures like Wassily Kandinsky and Paul Klee. Though the Bauhaus aspired to equality between the sexes, women were still discouraged from learning certain disciplines including painting. Albers began weaving by default, but it was in textiles that she found her means of expression, dedicating herself to the medium for the majority of her career.

The exhibition will explore how, here in the school’s vibrant weaving workshop, traditional hand-weaving was redefined as modern art. Continue reading →

Makers’ Tales’: Catarina Riccabona

‘Makers’ Tales’ showcase: Catarina Riccabona at the Guy Goodfellow Collection Showroom

 In celebration of the London Design Festival, textile artist and weaver Catarina Riccabona will be joining the series of  ‘Makers’ Tales’ showcases in the Guy Goodfellow Collection showroom.

Cartarina loves working with her hands. She enjoy the flexibility, the spontaneous changes and the direct contact with the materials that is possible when weaving by hand.

She makes one-off interior pieces, mostly throws, and, more recently, wall hangings.

Her textiles are often large compositions featuring areas of juxtaposed weave structures.

Catarinas’ practice is based on environmental values. She works with a well-researched selection of yarns. She predominantly use natural (unbleached, undyed) linen in her warps. For the weft yarns she likes to work with linen, hemp, wool, alpaca and second-hand or recycled yarns.

Her favourite supplier for plant-dyed wool is a woman in Finland who grows all the ingredients in her own garden and dyes small batches of local rare breed wool by hand.

Every time her results differ slightly, and Catarina loves these subtle and unpredictable nuances.

Recycled linen can be another source of colour and also Catarina buys it from a UK company that re-spins industrial surplus into new yarn. The colours are limited and depend on what is available at any given time. She enjoys this challenge of finding solutions within a set of limitations.

Catarina also collect warp remnants from weave colleagues which she knots them back together to form a continuous string to be used in the weft. During weaving the little knots appear all over the cloth and form a distinct feature that is reminiscent of elements in tribal textiles from all over the world.

This hand-made and natural character that is typical of tribal textiles has always had a strong appeal for her.

‘Makers’ Tales’ showcases invited artists and makers in a series of exhibitions designed to celebrate the fine traditions of artisan design and production.

The latest showcase “Catarina Riccabona Hand-woven Textiles” is on from 17th September to 12th October. She will be at the GGC showroom on the 20th September for a “Meet the Maker” day to discuss her work and explain the ethos behind her practice.

Guy Goodfellow Collection Showroom.15 Langton Street, London SW10 0JB
www.guygoodfellowcollection.com   Tel: 020 7352 9002

Text and images, with thanks to Catarina Riccabona

Exhibition: Le Kilt & Norn

Luxury womenswear brand Le Kilt and experimental design consultancy NORN host an exhibition and workshop at The Michael Hoppen Gallery to explore the reappropriation of traditional materials through craftsmanship and its relationship to punk subculture. The opening night event includes discussions with industry stalwarts as well as a Le Kilt pop-up retail space.

The exhibition features a series of installations that look at the relationship between punk and tradition in the context of craftsmanship. Le Kilt works with small-scale manufacturers to create their version of the modern woman’s uniform, whilst also adding new and unexpected design details such as hand-woven patches made from yarn spun in-house. Similarly, NORN places making and the haptic at the heart of its process; exploring the scope of making beyond conventional expectation of hand skills. Continue reading →

Exhibition: Sue Hiley Harris

Sue Hiley Harris
‘Woven and Drawn’
Tuesday 29 May – Saturday 9 June
11 am – 5 pm
Venue: Lansdown Gallery Stroud GL5 1BB

Sue Hiley Harris is best known for the abstract handwoven sculpture she has been making since the late 1990s. This may be understood in relation to constructed abstract art generally, whether two or three dimensional. Material, structure and form are inter-dependent.

The forms are often derived from pure geometric shapes. These may be repeated or become multiple parts of a complete work. Sometimes they allude to natural forms or to life’s continuous natural cycle. The bare upland landscape of the Black Mountains and the Brecon Beacons has, for many years, been important in Sue’s life and has made an impact on her weaving.

In 2013 Sue was awarded a Creative Wales Award by the Arts Council of Wales to ‘explore the possibility of making woven body sculpture’. As part of this exploration Sue returned to drawing the figure from life after a break of almost forty years. This has stimulated an inter-est in drawing in the landscape. The drawings in this exhibition are a direct emotional re-sponse to regular visits to a particular part of Priory Groves, a wooded area near to her home in Brecon.
Continue reading →

Exhibition: Hannah Waldron

‘Primary Traveller’
New works by textile artist Hannah Waldron

‘Primary Traveller’ opens at the Select Festival on 21 April 2018

Hannah Waldron’s new work Primary Traveller is a nomadic modular structure that will house a new body of weavings specially created for this exhibition. Commissioned by and for the Select Festival.

‘Primary Traveller’ is an ambitious new work; a textile installation which will serve as a meeting place for discussion around the role of textiles and tapestry today.

Alongside are retrospective pieces that have previously toured internationally but have never been shown in England.

The space will be a meeting place for discussion on the work, its themes and the larger role of contemporary textile practises within both art and craft production and exhibition ecologies.
Continue reading →

Exhibition: 1580 | Space & Volume

Dates: 5th March – 25th April 2018.
Meet the Maker: 21st March 2018
Address: The Guy Goodfellow Collection Showroom,
15 Langton Street.
London. SW10 0JL.

During London Design Week 2018, Master weaver, Philippa Brock showcases her three dimensional  woven textiles work, in the Guy Goodfellow Collection Showroom  as part of their “Makers Tales” series. A celebration of innovation in constructed textiles.

Philippa is showing some of her new abstract works, from the series  ‘1580: Volume and Space in the Third Dimension’,  informed by endless repetition, medieval ruff sizes, cellular kite construction and psychedelic honeycomb mushrooms.

This work explores the experimental weaving of multiple vertical interconnecting layers, that expand into 3D forms once removed from the loom. These pieces are sized and suspended, resulting in a series of abstract kinetic works interplaying with shadow and form. Continue reading →

Exhibition: Tactile Tectonics

Tactile Tectonics – Weaving Nature in 3 dimensions

Stacey Harvey-Brown
7th April – 12th May 2018
Wed – Sat 10-4pm (May 6th 11-4)

Tactile Tectonics – informed by geology, erosion and the sea, tubular woven Growth Forms and undulating Strata Walls explore an evolving world of dimensionality and tactility in textural weaving by Stacey Harvey-Brown. Metamorphosis from rock to coral to medusa, all is possible with imagination, natural and manmade materials and versatile weave structures.

Stacey Harvey-Brown draws from natural forms found wherever she has travelled (New Zealand, Europe, US, South America). Limestone cliffs, stalactites, strata layers were the initial inspiration behind Tactile Tectonics and developed during her Masters degree (University of Derby, 2011-14), but audience interpretation from joint exhibitions in New Zealand, North-West US (2014), Switzerland (2015), and Holland (2016) has led her recently to explore similar albeit living formations found in the sea – medusa, nudibranches, flatworms, seaweeds, corals – and develop some wearable pieces. Made to be touched, this is a tactile exhibition. Continue reading →

Exhibitions & Events: Dovecot Studios


Baths to Bobbins 10 years at Infirmary Street
From 29 March 2018

The Infirmary Street Baths were the first public baths in Edinburgh, built in 1885 by Robert Morham. Following the enactment in 1846 to Encourage the Establishment of Public Baths and Wash-houses, baths were built in Scotland from the 1850s to provide accessible washing facilities to improve public health. Until the 1870s women had to attend at different times from men. In the Ladies Baths space at Dovecot, we see an example of their needs being considered in the building design.

Dovecot was originally located at the site of the Corstorphine Castle, before moving in 2008 to Infirmary Street following a 2 year renovation and restoration project of the former Victorian baths building.

Celebrating 10 years of weaving in the Infirmary Street Baths, Dovecot will share some memories on the Tapestry Studio Viewing Balcony. The display titled Baths to Bobbins will explore memories of those who attended the Baths, the stories of the old Studio in Corstorphine, the saving of the Infirmary Street building and its conversion to a modern tapestry studio.

Screen for Another Focus | David Penny

25 May 2018 to 11 July 2018

As part of the 10-year anniversary of Dovecot’s new life at the old Infirmary Street Baths, Edinburgh, artist David Penny has created an exhibition of photography and video work interpreting the extraordinary craftsmanship of the weavers at Dovecot Tapestry Studio. Penny is interested in the materiality of objects and the aesthetics of technology as well as the actions of the body.

The project comprises images, which offer a focus on the forms, gestures and structures of the process of weaving and suggests parallels between the disciplines of photography and tapestry.

From footage and frames collected during a period of visits to Dovecot during 2017, this work sheds new light on the exceptional craftsmanship and making in Scotland. Continue reading →