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Jacquard x Google Arts & Culture – Artist Residency

Google Arts & Culture and Jacquard (Google ATAP) are launching the first artist-in-residency with the goal of exploring synergies between technology, art, and fashion.

The programme
Google Arts & Culture and Jacquard (Google ATAP) are launching the first artist-in-residency with the goal of exploring synergies between technology, art, and fashion at Google Arts & Culture Lab in Paris. Curated by Pamela Golbin, the program will enable three artists to conceive of and create works that explore textiles, connectivity, and creativity over the course of a five month residency. 

This residency will grant the three artists access to the core of Jacquard technology, factories in Japan, mentoring from Jacquard and Google Arts & Culture engineers, mentoring from Pamela Golbin and Memo Akten, and access to the Google Lab space and resources in Paris. 

The end of the residency will be celebrated by showcasing the art installations at a private event in October 2019 and potential partner museums. Additionally, final work and the Making Of process will be featured in a dedicated section on Google Arts & Culture platform. 
 Artists will own the IP of their artwork.

The Residency includes:
– Weekly advisory meetings with Google Arts & Culture Lab and Jacquard engineers – Access to Jacquard Research and Development teams – Artist mentors : Pamela Golbin and Memo Akten – Dedicated Creative Coder and hardware prototyping team- Jacquard Factory visit and inspiration trip in Japan- Three weeks at the Google Arts and Culture lab in Paris- Stipend of 10k€ gross for each artist – Production budget and Jacquard material production: 15k€ for each artist

Eligibility
This opportunity is open to artists of all ages, at any point in their career. Though strong support is provided alongside technical expertise from Google Arts & Culture Lab and Jacquard engineers, the artist must be eager to explore new technologies and be capable of delivering a fully finished project that incorporates Jacquard technology by the end of the residency period.

It is envisioned as a five month full-time residency, but allows flexibility for the artist to pursue other projects and work during the residency.
Artists must be available once per month for production reviews as well as at the start and at the end of the residency in Paris. 

Both new projects and projects that are in development but are not yet completed are eligible. Candidates will be selected based on the strength of their project as well as their ability to deliver, and a demonstration that the residency will be beneficial.

Artists should grant the right to display their artwork as well as document the making of process. Apart from Jacquard background IP, artists must guarantee full ownership or right of use in perpetuity of the used material, including musical rights if applicable. 
Note: Program participants must make their own arrangements to and from Paris. 

Timeline 
1st April 2019: Deadline for applications
3rd April 2019 : Email to the 10 selected artists , 5th of April 2019 : Artists to present their work to the jury (by VC or in person at the Lab in Paris) 8th of April 2019 : Announcement of the 3 final artists selected 16-17-18th of April 2019 : START of the RESIDENCY (mandatory days at the Google Arts and Culture Lab in Paris) May 2019 : Jacquard factories and partners visit week in Japan  31st of September 2019 : END of the RESIDENCY (Internal presentation of the working installations) Oct 2019: Outcome presented at TBD [Institutional Partner’s] exhibition space in Paris. 

APPLY HERE Deadline Monday 1st of April 2019 at 18.00 CET / 9:00 PST .

Images, Text and further information Google Arts & Culture and Jacquard 

Rita Parniczky: ‘Broken Bones’

Rita Parniczky works with photography, video and sculpture including weave and mixed media. Her work predominantly explores structure, visual change, slow time and human behaviour.

Amongst other awards, the work has received the Wall Hanging Award from The Worshipful Company of Weavers and is included in the permanent collection of the V&A Museum.

Most recently, Rita has become recipient of the Theo Moorman Trust Award. Her project reassessed her woven work investigating the role of textiles through experimentation, with new structural works and meeting Sheila Hicks.

In the new body of work Rita juxtaposed her original woven medium with plaster. This defamiliarising act initially addressed her experience of the reception of her woven work, the expectations and limitations attached to the medium leading her to investigate how these are formed around objects, or people.

While handling plaster she re-connected with memories of having broken bones as a child, and the limitations she experienced through the protection from her family. This raised further questions and meanings of the way we process our surrounding informing the work ‘Broken Bones’ aesthetically and conceptually. 

If ‘X-Ray’ series exposes the skeletal structure of the woven body mixed-media work, ‘Broken Bones’ seals it back again. Rita breaks some plaster off the surface; these fragments, as integral part of the work, carry the imprints of the woven arrangement narrating alternative stories, some personal or fantasy such as the idea of artefacts found at excavation sites.

This project enabled Rita to evolve her woven medium to its next phase to investigate fundamental questions about human response, expressing personal stories and reclaiming past experience through materiality.

The process will give existing materials another meaning and role in life while experimenting with different ideas and outcomes. For more information email and follow @rita_parniczky

Raising questions how expectations are formed her experimental work expresses ideas on human behaviour and reclaims personal stories through materiality. Rita will be teaching a Weaving Summer Workshop at Saterglantan Institute  in Sweden this July.

The weaving workshop will focus on experimental weave, to  build structures from uncommon materials. The workshop will be exploring materials commonly used by other industries and disciplines, those second-hand or rejected goods; the process gives existing materials another meaning and role in life while you experiment with different ideas and outcomes.

This concept-led workshop will encourages participants to think freely and to experiment with weave as a medium for building structures out of uncommon materials.

Prior to, and at the beginning, to the workshop participants will collect various materials that are not usually used in weave however can be woven in some ways.

These may include materials commonly used by other industries or disciplines, second-hand or rejected goods and any of these partially changed or worked-onto to make it available for loom work.

Workshop dates 29 July – 4 August 2019

Text & Images: Rita Parniczky. Instagram: @rita_parniczky

The Royal Pavillion – Brighton: His Majesty’s Geranium and Gold Silk

Humphries Weaving of Sudbury, Suffolk was involved in the prestigious national restoration at the Brighton Pavilion Saloon 

Built for George IV when he was Prince of Wales, the Royal Pavilion in Brighton is one of the most extravagant buildings of its age.

The room is now faithfully restored to its 1823 glory after conservation and restoration work started in 2002 and costing in the region of £390,000.

Highlights of the restoration include silver and ‘pearl white’ wall decoration using platinum leaf and the revitalisation of the magnificent gilding. A newly commissioned reproduction circular carpet by Axminster Carpets, with a lavish design of dragons, sun rays and lotus leaves adorns the floor.

Geranium and Gold silk woven by Humphries Weaving, Sudbury has been used for wall panels, magnificent drapery and furniture. A film has been made of the process of reproducing the original fabric.

The quest for His Majesty’s silk from Humphries Weaving on Vimeo. Continue reading →

Weaving: Contemporary Makers on the Loom | Katie Treggiden

There is  an exciting scene of professional designers, artisans and artists that continue to revitalise the centuries-old craft today.

From rugs and wall hangings to artistic installations and subversive interventions, contemporary expressions of the craft are as diverse as they are numerous.

Weaving – Contemporary Makers on the Loom presents a survey of this vibrant revival, with profiles of over twenty contemporary weavers:

Argentinian Alexandra Kehayoglou, designs breath-taking natural landscapes (for the likes of Dries van Noten), while Daniel Harris (UK) makes textiles for famous clothing brands using nineteenth century looms.

Brent Wadden (Canada) weaves beautiful, museum-standard fabrics.

The book includes  images of their studios, work and inspiration and indepth essays on the craft’s relationship with themes such as emancipation, migration and new technologies.

The featured weavers in the book are Alexandra Kehayoglou (Argentina), Allyson Rousseau
(Canada), Brent Wadden (Canada), Christy Matson (US), Daniel Harris (UK), Dee Clements (US), Diedrick Brackens (US), Dienke Dekker (Netherlands), Eleanor Pritchard (UK), Erin M. Riley (US), Genevieve Griffiths (New Zealand), Hermine Van Dijck (Belgium), Hiroko Takeda (Japan), Ilse Acke (Belgium), Jen Keane (UK), Judit Just (Spain), Karin Carlander (Denmark), Kayla Mattes (US), Lauren Chang (US), Rachel Scott (UK), Rachel Snack (US) and Tanya Aguiñiga (Mexico). In the Weaving Futures section are included Jorien Wiltenburg, Philippa Brock (UK)  & Jen Keane (UK), amongst others. Continue reading →

Flex | Phyllis Hahn

Flex: Exploring flexibility through solid and soft materials in woven structures, is a textile design collection by recent graduate Phyllis Hahn from the Swedish School of Textiles. A work which challenges the traditional function and behaviour of woven textiles by exploring flexibility, scale and materials.

Her work started out with an interest in the border between textiles and furniture. With a focus on the carpet, questions such as ’what is a carpet and when does its function change?’ pushed the work forward.

Eventually, this evolved into a exploration of flexibility within woven structures and by integrating solid materials such as wood and cardboard into the weaving process and combining those with pliable materials such as wool, polyester and cotton, she explores flexibility in the weave through materials and their opposite qualities.

The materials each have their inherent qualities and the weaving technique presents a physical realm in which they have to cooperate. In this way the solid material becomes flexible and also gives flexibility to the woven structure due to its weight, shape and placement. Continue reading →

Tengri Textile Innovation Award Winner 2018: Henrietta Johns

Henrietta Johns is the winner of the new Tengri Textile Innovation Award 2018.

Tengri, a luxury material innovator and pioneering fashion and lifestyle brand, announced the winners of its inaugural Tengri Innovation Award, launched this year to encourage the implementation of sustainable fashion and textiles working towards a more sustainable industry standard and future.

The award was open to final-year students of the Tengri Innovation Partnership, an initiative which includes some of the UK’s most influential academic and creative institutions.

Designers were invited to present innovative and sustainable approaches to textiles, to meet criteria set to demonstrate forward-thinking conceptualisation of sustainable fibres and practices that rework cultural and traditional techniques. Critically, these practices would be set to demonstrate the preservation of heritage in fabrication, construction and production.

London design house Tengri, champions the use of rare fibres from endemic animals, including the yak, an ancient animal dating back 10,000 years, and a rare species of yak from the Khangai region of Mongolia unrecognised by the textile industry until Tengri’s launch in 2014.

The studio is committed to referencing nature and natural reinvention to create a sustainable future, and working to commercialise heritage and traditional techniques as part of a sustainable production cycle in luxury fashion.

Applicants of the Tengri Innovation Awards were not only invited to present proposals for the integration of sustainable fibres, but also how this would further be developed in their approach and techniques post-graduation.

As winner of the Tengri Innovation Award, Henrietta receives a one-year mentorship with Tengri, as well as a six-month paid internship supported with Tengri Noble Yarns for production and a cash prize.

Henrietta Johns, recently graduated inBA (Hons) Textile Design  from Central Saint Martins, specialising in woven textiles. Her work is rooted in a deep exploration of natural animal fibres and innovative designs using traditional felting techniques, creating new fabric surfaces with 100% animal fibre. Continue reading →

Norn x Denim Days

This September New York Textile Month takes over the City for its third year. As part of the month long celebration of fabric and making;  Denim Days is returning for a weekend of all things Indigo.

Norn Design is exhibiting at Denim Days with its new Denim Collection of samples and concept pieces.  Look for Norn Design in the program for stand info.

The Norn studio is tucked behind London’s only Craft Jean Factory: Blackhorse Lane Ateliers . Infected by the hum of the denim factory, Norn began dreaming about the possibilities of handwoven denim. Starting with the basics, Indigo and Cotton, they have been expanding and challenging the notion of ‘Denim’ as a woven cloth.

Through exploration of texture, structure, colour and hand weaving techniques we have developed a collection of Norn Denims.

The collection of hand woven denims recognises tradition whilst being focused firmly on the untapped potential of denim. From denim cloth for fashion, to corded and hand tufted rugs, hand woven art pieces and denim blankets Norn Denim is a range of conceptual objects and ideas that ask you to consider what denim can be. Continue reading →

Exhibition: ‘Praktis | Mind and Matter

‘Praktis | Mind and Matter: The Making of Craft

Fifteen designer makers are exhibiting their work in  Bury Court Barn and its garden in October.

The exhibitors, renowned practitioners in ceramics, wood, willow, jewellery and textiles will show pieces for sale or commission, and reveal their thinking, inspiration and working methods in practical demonstrations and illustrated talks during the exhibition.

The stages of making – the consideration, the preparation and the sheer repetition of creating something by hand, all play an equal part in the finished object.

Ideas often take hours of work on paper or experimenting with materials before they are made. It is necessary to understand and learn from traditions, but for a contemporary maker to move forward requires having an idea that can push both the materials and the technique in a new direction: this can be extremely satisfying both for the maker and the observer, as it both respects but also questions what can be achieved with the materials and technique. Continue reading →

Makers’ Tales’: Catarina Riccabona

‘Makers’ Tales’ showcase: Catarina Riccabona at the Guy Goodfellow Collection Showroom

 In celebration of the London Design Festival, textile artist and weaver Catarina Riccabona will be joining the series of  ‘Makers’ Tales’ showcases in the Guy Goodfellow Collection showroom.

Cartarina loves working with her hands. She enjoy the flexibility, the spontaneous changes and the direct contact with the materials that is possible when weaving by hand.

She makes one-off interior pieces, mostly throws, and, more recently, wall hangings.

Her textiles are often large compositions featuring areas of juxtaposed weave structures.

Catarinas’ practice is based on environmental values. She works with a well-researched selection of yarns. She predominantly use natural (unbleached, undyed) linen in her warps. For the weft yarns she likes to work with linen, hemp, wool, alpaca and second-hand or recycled yarns.

Her favourite supplier for plant-dyed wool is a woman in Finland who grows all the ingredients in her own garden and dyes small batches of local rare breed wool by hand.

Every time her results differ slightly, and Catarina loves these subtle and unpredictable nuances.

Recycled linen can be another source of colour and also Catarina buys it from a UK company that re-spins industrial surplus into new yarn. The colours are limited and depend on what is available at any given time. She enjoys this challenge of finding solutions within a set of limitations.

Catarina also collect warp remnants from weave colleagues which she knots them back together to form a continuous string to be used in the weft. During weaving the little knots appear all over the cloth and form a distinct feature that is reminiscent of elements in tribal textiles from all over the world.

This hand-made and natural character that is typical of tribal textiles has always had a strong appeal for her.

‘Makers’ Tales’ showcases invited artists and makers in a series of exhibitions designed to celebrate the fine traditions of artisan design and production.

The latest showcase “Catarina Riccabona Hand-woven Textiles” is on from 17th September to 12th October. She will be at the GGC showroom on the 20th September for a “Meet the Maker” day to discuss her work and explain the ethos behind her practice.

Guy Goodfellow Collection Showroom.15 Langton Street, London SW10 0JB
www.guygoodfellowcollection.com   Tel: 020 7352 9002

Text and images, with thanks to Catarina Riccabona

2018 Graduate Weavers: University of Huddersfield

Laura Trowsdale
Laura graduated from the University of Huddersfield with a First Class BSc (Hons) degree in woven textiles. During her final year of study Laura was awarded winner of the Northern England heat and runner-up in the UK final of the Society of Dyers & Colourists International Design Competition.

In addition to showcasing her final collection at New Designers she previously completed work placements at M&S Head Office, woven design studio Rare Thread and trend forecasting agencies Scarlet Opus, Colour Hive and Unique Style Platform after successfully being awarded a bursary by The Clothworkers Company.

Her final collection combined innovative colour blending and traditional, technical leno hand weaving skills. Presented in a palette that ranged from fresh bright to deep dark tones, the set of sophisticated fabrics were directed towards the high end apparel market.

Early sample developments adopted a multidisciplinary approach; combining woven textiles and digital print. Continue reading →